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Book Review The Grumble-Free Year

Keri L. Willis

The Grumble-Free Year by Tricia Goyer

 Do everything without grumbling or arguing, so that you may become blameless and pure, “children of God without fault in a warped and crooked generation.” Then you will shine among them like stars in the sky as you hold firmly to the word of life. Philippians 2:14-16

Driving to the airport this morning, the book “The Grumble Free Year” started echoing in my head. I buy into all of Tricia’s ideas of how not to grumble, but, honestly, it is almost too much to ask for me drive on our Southern California freeways and not grumble. 

All of that to say, Tricia reminds us of what it means to have a heart of gratitude and grace rather than one of grumbling and grumping. Rather than grumping about the crazy flow of traffic or the lack thereof, maybe I should be grateful that I have a car to drive my husband to the airport where he will be able to take a plane to the other side of the country in a couple of hours where he will learn and teach new skills to help him be more successful in his job. 

Tricia is a full-time author, homeschool mother of nine and minister’s wife who understands the benefit of having a home and heart of peace and lack of grumbling. Each of the family members helped to identify their own ways of grumbling; eye rolls, crossed arms, whispering words of criticism, outright complaining etc. They all agreed to work with each other to encourage hearts of gratitude. After a while it became a habit to NOT complain, and Tricia was able to see genuine change in her family and their home. 

We get to receive the benefit from their work. Tricia journaled the family progress, what worked and what did not. She challenges the readers with activities after each chapter to help us also become grumble free.

I recommend this book to people of all ages with 5 stars. 

My name is Keri Willis. I am a semi-retired educator. I spent a great deal of my career working with adults with developmental disabilities and many years in elementary education, in the classroom and as an administrator. My main ministry now is coordinating the women’s ministry for our church in San Diego, CA. I have been married thirty-four years and have two grown and married children. I now have a head of full grey hair and good ideas.
I believe we are created to use our gifts and to be creative. That comes in many forms for me. I love to woodwork and use power tools, design, decorate, garden, and create new recipes. And I love to write. One major lesson I have learned in my writing journey is that I need to be still and listen to hear God’s voice before I am prepared to put into words the message he has instilled in my heart. This has been much easier since I am no longer working full time, but it is so easy to get distracted and not listen, which almost always ends with an empty page in the form of writer’s block.
While I have written many articles for newsletters and local newspapers, I did not consider myself a writer until I self-published my first book, Teapots and Power Tools. https://www.amazon.com/Teapot…/dp/1466458763/ref=sr_1_3…
The idea emerged as I was working on a project in my garage. I had worship music playing, power tools out and saw dust flying. I glanced up and saw my delicate teapot sitting on my router table. The message was clear. Sometimes we are using the power tools God gives us and sometimes he just wants us to be still and have tea with him. The book became the foundation for a women’s retreat, and then my amazing niece helped me work through publishing it on Create Space (now KDP).
At least five other projects are in different stages of production. I joined hope*writers to help motivate me and keep me focused and accountable. I am still trying to figure out the whole website and blog thing. That is my next goal for myself; that and finish writing at least one of my projects!
Teapots and Power Tools: Effectively using the tools God has equipped you with, while taking time to “Be Still and Know That He is God”
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Used with permission from Keri L. Willis.

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